Tag Archives: acceptance

Mosquitoes and a lesson on Surrender

I was few minutes in to my evening mediation, when I felt that familiar prick on my hand.

I was away for a few days. The windows of the room were left open by mistake and apparently many mosquitoes (they are very common in Bangalore) had found their way in. And I did not realize this until I sat down to meditate.

I had had a very disturbed weekend and was looking forward to a deep mediation to set my mind right. And it was then the distraction came in the form of a mosquito. The moment it bit me, there was this deep reflex to raise my hand and kill it. But one of the first rules in meditation is to keep the body absolutely still. I decided to ignore the discomfort, but in a meditative state the pain (and the irritation) was disproportionately high.

Some time pass by and the urge in me to lift mind hand and strike it was so overpowering and finally unable to hold it any further, I finally raised my hand and struck it. As I went back my meditation, to my horror I found there were many of them now. I was in a deep fix. They were biting me on my back, hands, legs and every other exposed place. And having given once in to the urge to move, I didn’t want to move.

Perhaps I should just accept it was my next thought. I could see that my mind was not too occupied with the problem. I was thinking about it and also concerned that my meditation would now be a failure. The more I thought about it, the more intense was the problem and more intense was the urge to open my eyes and kill all of them.

OK. Let me just accept it fully, I said to myself. I paid complete attention to the pain and irritation of the mosquito bite and dropped any thinking about it. (At some point I even tried to imagine that I was loving the bite, which I think did not work well). It was somewhat tricky at the beginning. As I brought my attention to a point of bite, they would fly and settle at another spot. But then after a while, I was able to simply pay attention to the bites and was not thinking about them. The pain seemed much exaggerated, but that didn’t matter.

I had a really wonderful meditation.

After I was done, while driving to the restaurent for dinner I was thinking about it. There is this deep urge in us to run away from unpleasant experiences. This is what makes many of us leave jobs, leave partners or pick up quarrels of trivial issues. True, there is this strong unconscious reactive pattern that triggers an emotional response to unpleasant situations. But what happens if that is ignored? The mind picks it and start making a story about it. The objective of the story is to convince you not to be foolish by not reacting.

An emotion is actually very short lived. But what gives it a life in time is the thinking. If the emotion is just accepted as it is without any thinking around it, it’s great feeling. There is nothing personal about it (good/bad, acceptable/unacceptable) it’s just a feeling that would vanish as quickly as it came.

This is what the Buddhist’s call surrender.

(Note: After the session, I did kill all those mosquitoes I could lay my hands on. Probably compassion is still farther on the path)

Advertisements

Conflicts are not resolved by our logical mind

I was attending a 5 day meditation course at the Art Of Living Center  last year. This is residential course and we are in silence for most of it. This is when I faced this problem. There was a gentle man who was doing service in the dining hall (for those of you who do not know, it is a common practice in India for people to stay in ashrams (spiritual centers) for some duration and do some service) who (I don’t know for what) was making people sit in perfect order without leaving gaps in between (We take our lunch and squat on the floor on mats to eat it).

I have always had this problem. Whenever some one tells me to do some trivial things a particular way, I have an irresistible urge not to do it that way. I don’t like being told where to park my car for example by the security person. And here was this guy, who wouldn’t let me sit wherever I liked. I tried, but he didn’t let me. And I gave in partly because I wasn’t supposed to be rude and mainly because I was in silence.

This repeated couple of times. Every time I went to the Dining Hall, this resistance surfaced and disturbed me. My mind (ego) said – this stupid guy shouldn’t be here. Afterall we are here to relax and be with ourselves. Why is he doing this useless thing? The disturbance was felt more, because the mind was settling down and there was nothing else around me that was disturbing. There was nothing I could do about it, but I could feel the resistance and the disturbance.

 On the third day, I decided to tackle this problem. To begin with, I decided to just avoid him. But this wasn’t working as I became very very conscious when I tried it and it disturbed me still.By then I could also sense him getting disturbed slightly by my presence. I think every human being can sense resistance and hostility pretty quickly.

I then decided to drop the resistance completely. I went about observing what was happening in the mind, to begin with and shortly the problem almost ceased to exist.

Now we were on the last day of the course and out of silence. Mind was clear, thoughtless and centered. I walked in to the dining hall. This guy was right there, making people sit in perfect rows (still I don’t know why). I just walked to him straight and with a smile told him – tell me if I you will permit me to sit wherever I like, at least for once. Only then I will pick my lunch. He just smiled and in a moment we both realized the stupidity of the whole thing. We hugged each other and all that resistance just melted like a snowflake. Very rarely have I felt that level of belongingness. Mind was so clear.

I don’t think need to try resolving conflicts the hard way. They just don’t exist when mind is settled we drop all the resistance. That is when we feel true belongingness.

Can the logical mind and analytical thinking ever resolve a conflict?

Self-help mantras leave you unhappier than before

Many newspapers today carried this study of self help mantras (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1197430/Revealed-Self-help-mantras-leave-unhappier-before.html) The study by some psychologists found that those with low self-esteem who repeated self-affirming statements (like I can win) actually ended up feeling worse about themselves. They suggests that unreasonably positive ‘self-statements’, such as ‘I accept myself completely’, simply remind individuals with low self-esteem how much they believe the opposite to be true.

I think this is not surprising, if you have read some of those best selling self help books. Each of them claim that you need to look no further to become the next Bill Gates or Barack Obama. You read them and spend the next few days ‘transfoming your life’, soon to find you back at sqare one. This ideal goal really widens the difference between what you are and what you should be. This process leaves you with a bad self-esteem and you are now more convinced that you cannot change.

I am not blindly accusing, could be there are books that are really valuable. But in general, I find some issues:

  1. Some of these books create those false definitions of success for you. In reality you are searching for happiness and freedom. And they tell you about success, and there is the assumption that success leads to happiness. It might seem appealing to our mind, but soon the self (sub concious or whatever you call it) realises that you are on a false trail.
  2. Many such books are written by people who do not have first hand experience. How many of them have been miserable, depressed and failed in life before they understand the truth? I think very rare. Instead they lay out those ideal life for for you, missing some very important points such as fear, ego etc.
  3. Most them talk to your concious mind. And any change you need to do in life with your concious mind needs lot of discipline. Anyone who is not accumsted to discipline can never sustain such a change. I think the real change need to happen deep within and it can only be the result of a true search.
  4. As a practice, we look for precriptive solutions. But every one is unique; your mind, thinking, attitude, response to a problem – everything is unique and personal. Very few prescriptive stuff will work for you, unless you are going to be disciplined. The change doesn’t happen at the mind level. But the mind makes us believe that it is supporting us in the change. (That’s why when we begin to practice Mindfulness, we end up giving a self commentory of what we do – I am now walking, I should not get angry now…)

These days, there is a huge market for self help books (OK, atleast they are successful), because everyone wants to change. We are 100% certain that we need to change in order to be happy and successful i n life. Let’s start with questioning that belief.

I liked a quote from Father De Mello You don’t have to do anything to acquire happiness. The great Meister Eckhart said very beautifully, “God is not attained by a process of addition to anything in the soul, but by a process of subtraction.” You don’t do anything to be free, you drop something. Then you’re free”.

How many self help gurus teach us the art of dropping?

Related Posts: Being true to yourself